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GIS Day 2021- Success!

On November 17th, 2021, we joined an international celebration of the power of Geographic Information Sciences and spatial thinking with the UofL Center for GIS and the Department of Geographic and Environmental Sciences! Check out photos from the day’s events here.

Program

9:30 AM – 12 PM, Chao Auditorium, Ekstrom Library Basement

  • A symposium of talks from community changemakers who use GIS to better our communities
  • 9:30 AM- 10 AM Welcome and Happy 25th Anniversary to the UofL Center for GIS

Two educators – one Black, one white – illustrate the path they have taken to better understand their own Blackness and whiteness respectively in order to lead justice-centered, place-based learning for young people. Their paths converge with the 2892 Miles to Go Geographic Walk for Justice in Louisville, where they are collaborating to support educators and youth to utilize geo-inquiry in order to deepen their understanding of history within their communities and its impact upon their own journeys as change leaders. They will discuss the upcoming inaugural 2892 Education Wayfinding Program in Louisville and how its intention is to launch a movement for communities around the nation – and the globe.

Marlesha S. Woods

Art Embodied, Interdisciplinary Artist & Teaching Artist

Marlesha S. Woods (she/her) is a Louisville native, a dedicated interdisciplinary artist, visual storyteller, creative placemaking strategist, writer, community researcher, and visual arts educator. Pairing visual arts with advocacy, Marlesha has partnered with non-profit organizations within the U.S. to strengthen communities, and spark vital conversations including: health equity, diversity, and civic rights.

She is a member of the National Guild for Community Arts Education, National Art Education Association, Teaching Artists Guild, and Black Arts & Cultural Center. Her work and scholarship, centered within the intersections of public health and art provide both cultural nuance, and context to develop sustainable community-programming.

As owner of Elsz & O Storytelling Gallery, she lends her consultancy and expertise in Louisville Metro and beyond. Marlesha is the National Equity in Arts Director of Lodgic Everyday Community. She is also a senior teaching artist of Neighborhood Associates Corporation, and an inaugural Project 2892 National Geographic Wayfinder. Her community-based research has been featured in collaboration with nationally recognized data-catalyst, Root Cause Research Center.

Her visual artistry includes wearable art with a focus on exclusive designs for the Muhammad Ali Center, and commissioned paintings including an emphasis on abstract expressionism intertwined with portraiture.

Dr. Lauren C. Heberle, director of UofL’s CEPM, will introduce the Brownfield Area Benefit Estimator (BABE), a nationwide toolkit developed in collaboration with E.P. Systems Group, Inc., Symbiont, the Urban Institute and Lazarus Group LLC. She will introduce two components of the toolkit: the Brownfields Tracker (BT), a mobile app to collect and manage baseline property condition data, and the Benefits Analysis Tool (BAT), a web-based analysis portal.  The Brownfield Tracker uses ESRI Survey 123 and is intended to be used as part of community data collection efforts to draw residents into decision-making processes related to identifying and cleaning up contaminated properties in their neighborhoods. The Brownfield Tracker can put the data collected into the hands of those collecting it to use as they see fit and systematically track changes to properties of concern over time. The BAT uses national, local, and hyper-local data to project community-centered benefits and changes associated with brownfield redevelopment to further conversations within communities about neighborhood-level impacts. Importantly, users define the area of interest themselves and receive a report with estimates based on geo-interpolated data at the appropriate unit of analysis. The goal is to help users ask and answer questions about ‘to whom’ the benefits of redevelopment accrue. Redevelopment impact analyses often center on the return on investment to the developer, municipality, or other stakeholders rather than existing residents. This project provides tools to deepen discussions related to involuntary displacement, racial inequity, and environmental justice embedded in brownfields clean-up and redevelopment practices.

Green Heart is a unique research project that examines if increasing green space in an urban neighborhood improves air quality, decreases heart disease risk, and improves neighborhood perceptions. The goal of this NIH-funded clinical trial is to develop a “greenprint” for creating healthier urban neighborhoods.
 
Six urban neighborhoods, home to 22,000 people, in Louisville were divided into intervention and control areas. Baseline assessments of air pollution, noise pollution, biodiversity, and human health were gathered in 2018-2019. Baseline health data were acquired from approximately 550 individuals through in-person exams measuring heart disease risk factors and pollution exposure. Validated surveys assessed demographics, diet, occupation, and mental and physical health. Air pollution levels and patterns of exposure were gathered using both stationary and mobile monitoring. Currently, the intervention, extensive green buffers designed to trap and redirect air pollution, is being installed.
 
After planting, the study team will reassess air pollution levels, heart disease risk, and psychosocial measures. This post-intervention assessment will reveal if air pollution levels decrease with an increase in greenness, if air pollution reduction contributes to reductions in heart disease risk, and if other neighborhood characteristics are altered. Green Heart could yield new, scalable insights into air pollution reduction at the neighborhood level without altering individual behavior, transportation pathways, or industrial footprints.

12 PM – 1 PM, Lutz Hall Atrium

  • Served pizza lunch and map gallery showcasing recent student, faculty and staff applications of GIS and spatial analysis.

1 PM – 3 PM, Lutz Hall, Helton GIS Laboratory, Room 224, and the 2020 Quad, outside of Lutz Hall (weather permitting)

  • Join Good Maps from 1PM to 2PM in the GIS Laboratory for some indoor mapping with Elliott Holmes and GoodMaps. By utilizing LiDAR and image recognition, we provide fast and accurate maps of indoor spaces. Join us at 1 PM or 2 PM to discuss accessibility and the usefulness of indoor mapping, along with an active, hands-on scanning demonstration.
  • Join ULCGIS Staff (weather permitting) from 2PM to 3PM in the 2020 Quad outside of Lutz Hall for a demonstration of the drone and unmanned aerial systems we have housed in the Department of Geographic and Environmental Sciences.

Meet the Presenters!

Ashley Lamb-Sinclair

Fellow & Consultant, National Geographic 

Ashley Lamb-Sinclair (she/her) is an award-winning educator currently serving as an Engaged Communities Consultant on the heels of a 2020 Fellowship at National Geographic. In her role at National Geographic Education, she leads projects like the 2892 Miles to Go Geographic Walk for Justice, supports a variety of programs, develops a host of content, and collaborates across the NatGeo community. Ashley Lamb-Sinclair served as the interim Director of Advocacy and Community at the National Excellence in School Leadership Institute, North America. She is also the founder and former CEO of Curio Learning, an edtech platform she built to support educator creativity and professional development. While leading the company, Lamb-Sinclair won several awards, including the grand prize in the Uber Girlboss pitch competition in 2018. She also collaborated with the talented team at LearnLaunch Accelerator in Boston while spearheading Curio’s growth. As 2016 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, she served as Teacher in Residence for the Kentucky Department of Education. She has received Fulbright and English-Speaking Union – Oxford scholarships. She is a storyteller, an educator, and an entrepreneur who is constantly seeking human-centered pathways toward social impact. She has been a contributing writer to several publications such as The Atlantic and Washington Post, primarily discussing education, entrepreneurship, women in leadership, equity, storytelling craft, and the intersections therein.

NyRee Clayton-Taylor

To engage, enlighten, and educate is NyRee Clayton-Taylor’s focus as she uses Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) to explore the therapeutic healing of writing, reading, and performing. By infusing the Kentucky Academic Standards and the elements of Hip-Hop, NyRee uses this non-traditional way to empower her students to write to heal.

NyRee didn’t think academic achievement was a possibility due to being retained in third grade, labeled with a learning disability, and characterized as a behavior problem. It wasn’t until a teacher saw her performing and encouraged her to use her talents to write poetry, that she decided to use her life as a catalyst. She changed her trajectory and became the first person in her family to graduate from college.

NyRee Clayton-Taylor considers her most significant contribution in education to be her ability to build relationships with students, parents, and teachers. Even now, as the 2019 KY Elementary Teacher of the Year, she shares her talents with students and colleagues through her leadership and volunteerism.

Marlesha S. Woods

Art Embodied, Interdisciplinary Artist & Teaching Artist

Marlesha S. Woods (she/her) is a Louisville native, a dedicated interdisciplinary artist, visual storyteller, creative placemaking strategist, writer, community researcher, and visual arts educator. Pairing visual arts with advocacy, Marlesha has partnered with non-profit organizations within the U.S. to strengthen communities, and spark vital conversations including: health equity, diversity, and civic rights.

She is a member of the National Guild for Community Arts Education, National Art Education Association, Teaching Artists Guild, and Black Arts & Cultural Center. Her work and scholarship, centered within the intersections of public health and art provide both cultural nuance, and context to develop sustainable community-programming.

As owner of Elsz & O Storytelling Gallery, she lends her consultancy and expertise in Louisville Metro and beyond. Marlesha is the National Equity in Arts Director of Lodgic Everyday Community. She is also a senior teaching artist of Neighborhood Associates Corporation, and an inaugural Project 2892 National Geographic Wayfinder. Her community-based research has been featured in collaboration with nationally recognized data-catalyst, Root Cause Research Center.

Her visual artistry includes wearable art with a focus on exclusive designs for the Muhammad Ali Center, and commissioned paintings including an emphasis on abstract expressionism intertwined with portraiture.

Dr. Lauren Heberle

Director, Center for Environmental Policy and Management

Dr. Lauren C. Heberle is the Director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Management and Associate Professor of Sociology. Dr. Heberle is also the lead investigator for the Community Engagement Core of the UofL Superfund Research Center. She teaches environmental and social policy courses and urban sociology. Her expertise is in community participation in environmental decision-making.  Her areas of research include urban redevelopment, environmental policy, environmental justice, community engagement, and sustainable development. She serves as a member of or expert witness to a variety of local and federal task forces and committees.

Lauren Anderson, MPA, PMP

Research Manager, Center for Healthy Air Water and Soil, Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute, University of Louisville School of Medicine
Lauren.Anderson@louisville.edu

Lauren Anderson (she/her) holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Louisville and is a Research Management Professional. As a Program Manager for the Envirome Institute and Center for Healthy Air Water and Soil, Lauren specializes in leading collaborative teams through community-facing projects and clinical trials. Lauren has a particular interest in project communication and research translation with a focus on environmental and wellbeing research. She is a part of the Green Heart and Co-Immunity Projects at the Envirome Institute.
 
Lauren has managed portfolios for the Institute for Healthy Air Water and Soil, a Louisville-based environmental nonprofit, the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness. Prior to joining Public Health, Lauren worked for Louisville Metro Community Services and received her Bachelor of Arts from Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky.

 

Founded in 2019 and based in Louisville, KY, GoodMaps was born out of the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) with one mission: to further the cause of accessible indoor navigation by providing users with accurate positioning and a trusted wayfinding experience. As pioneers in our field, we leverage geospatial technologies such as LiDAR and GIS to rapidly produce accurate 2D and 3D representations of indoor spaces to make them more accessible, productive, and safe for all users. Though we’re growing every day, our current reach includes buildings such as airports, museums, and schools and extends throughout the US, Canada, and Europe.

Learn more at their website.

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